Reviews

Iran’s intriquing new weave of tradition and change

  CS Monitor, December 16, 2004 , By Helena Cobban QOM, IRAN - On a recent Thursday, the marble-paved courtyards of Qom's. 400-year-old Hazrat-e Masumeh shrine were filled with family groups of Shiite pilgrims from different communities. Many were Iranians, but I also heard snatches of Arabic amid the Farsi and saw faces from throughout central Asia and saris from the Indian subcontinent. Like nearly all the women here, I was wrapped in an all-encompassing black chador. (It's hard to keep that massive, single piece of cloth from slithering to…
kadivarad33
2004/12/16
Reviews

The New Intellectuals in Iran

    Abstract For a long time intellectuals in Iran have been at the crossroads of two distinct sources of influence: Western thought and Shiite thought. These two traditions began to exert their contradictory influence from the end of the 19th century onwards. The Islamic revolution was the result of a social movement and an intellectual trend, resulting in the renewal of Islamic thought exposed to Western Marxist and Third-worldist ideas. Since then, three generations of intellectuals have been active. There has been a divergent new intellectual trend since the…
kadivarad33
2004/06/15
Reviews

Adapting to Contemporary Islam

By : Bahman Nirumand, © Qantara.de 2003, Translation from German: Aingeal Flanagan Published: 18.12.2003 - Last modified: 19.01.2005   Is Islamic law compatible with democracy and human rights? One of Iran’s best-known reformist clerics has an answer to this question – an answer that challenges Islamic orthodoxy. Journalist Bahman Nirumand reports on a progressive and uncomfortable reformist theologian. Born in 1959, Mohsen Kadivar originally wanted to be an electronic engineer. However, after only a few semesters, he turned his back on the Technical University in the south Iranian city of…
kadivarad33
2003/12/18
Reviews

Critics Within: Islamic Scholars’ Protests agaist the Islamic State in Iran

    Kurzman, Charles; Critics Within: Islamic Scholars’ Protests agaist the Islamic State in Iran; an Islamic Reformation? Edited by: Michealle Browers and Charles Kurzman;(Lexington Books, New York, 2004); chap 4, pp. 88-89.   Abstract Islamic scholarship, in Iran and elsewhere, has a long tradition of debate and critique. This tradition has come to pose a challenge to the constitutional order of the Islamic Republic of Iran, as a number of seminary-trained scholars have applied their critical methods to basic issues of state legitimacy, in particular the state's right to…
kadivarad33
2003/12/17
Reviews

The Reform Movement and the Debate on Modernity and Tradition in Contemporary Iran

Abstract To appreciate the significance of the reform movement represented by the books selected for this survey, one needs the sharply contrasting background of Islamic thought in Iran from the mid-1960s to the end of 1980s, the period perceptively surveyed by Mehrzad Boroujerdi in Iranian Intellectuals and the West. Boroujerdi shows that the moral indignation against Westernization in Iran pre-dated the outburst of revolution in 1979 by a few decades, beginning as a series of nativistic protests that gradually cohered in the shape of an Islamic ideology. The mythical construction of…
kadivarad33
2002/11/15
Reviews

Reform, Attack from within

Dissident political theology in contemporary Iran By Mahmoud Sadri February 13, 2002 The Iranian In a recent trip to Amsterdam, I visited a diamond cutting factory where rapidly revolving disks coated with diamond dust and olive oil are used to cut facets on rough diamonds; which reminded me of the old saying: "Only diamond can cut diamond." A dominant theology is more vulnerable to the challenge of a reformist theology from within the sphere of religious discourse than to secular attacks from without. It is true, Christianity had a secular…
kadivarad33
2002/02/13
Reviews

Post-revelutionary Discourses of Mohammad Mojtahed Shabestari and Mohsen Kadivar: Reconciling the Terms of Mediated Subjectivity

Post-revolutionary Discourses of Mohammad Mojtahed Shabestari and Mohsen Kadivar Reconciling the Terms of Mediated Subjectivity Part II: Mohsen Kadivar By : 'Farzin Vahdat'   In Part I of this article, published in the Spring 2000 issue of this journal, I explored the discourse of Mohammad Mojtahed Shabestari, an Islamic thinker engaged in the process ofadvancing Islamic revolutionary thought into new dimensions.  Here, I turn to a second such cleric, Mohsen Kadivar, who has been an outspoken advocate of reform in the post-revolutionary era and even served a prison sentence because of his…
kadivarad33
2001/10/01